HOT PRESS GIG REVIEW

OÍCHE PRESENTS A NIGHT OF LIVE MUSIC WITH WHERE’S LUKE AND GUESTS AT BELLO BAR

Photographs by Ezell Jordan

Music Review by Natalie Dyer via Hotpress Magazine

Four unique acts play an eclectic mix of r&b/soul, electronic, funk and rock music to a familiar crowd.

For those who are regulars at these types of events, I don’t need to tell you about Bello Bar. To those who aren’t, we’re talking shaggy carpet and a low ceiling basement. Tables with wax laden gin bottles acting as candlestick holders. A non-raised stage area with fairy lights draped over the microphone. Orange amplifiers. Frayed lampshades that prettify dimly lit corners. It’s easy to become ensconced in Bello Bar’s intimate and evocative surroundings.

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As I grab a seat by the wall, Argentinian musician, Facundo Di Giorgio, begins to warm the crowd with 80s blues rock on lead guitar. Going full throttle with note-bending on the whammy bar, he also runs Olympic rings around the fretboard.

Next up is Claire Z and her r&b-soul-funk fusion band. On backing vocals, two soft coos bolster Claire’s fervent second soprano notes. Halfway through the performance, our lead singer asks if she can be “cheeky” and have the lights dimmed. The drummer comes in with a marching band beat and our bassist goes for a walk to the sleaziest part of town. The song does funk proud.

Ambient electro-soul-pop crooners, Dreaming of Jupiter, follow suit with a medley of tracks. Appeasing the seated crowd, lead singer and keyboardist, Zoë Gough, asks punters to sing back song lyrics. The band are keen to show that their talents aren't one dimensional as they switch instruments and create pedal loops mid-song.

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To end the night, Where’s Luke appear onstage to a now drunk but tame crowd. Their first song - laced with an air of UB40 and Sting - sits well with the many friends there to see them. A standout song in their playlist is the sixth one, which revels in a state of dejection but changes the pace for an otherwise energetic show. Though the band’s own tunes bring forth heartfelt bluesy soul rock - which lead vocalist, Adam Weafer, clearly loves to sing - the audience seem to prefer well known soft rock covers such as ‘Can’t Stop’ from The Chilli Peppers and their Beatles finisher, ‘Come Together’.